London to host Global Clinical Trials Connect 2018

London will be the proud host of Global Clinical Trials Connect this year, a conference with a mission. The focus is to introduce innovative new technology to the pharmaceutical field, cultivate patient engagement, and allow organisations to brainstorm ideas for the future. The recent downturn in productivity will turn into the thing that drives the conference to build such ideas.

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A recent downturn

The global pharmaceutical industry has slowed down, and there are a huge number of reasons. Chiefly, it seems, is the financial difficulty associated with moving the industry forward. The cost attributed to developing products and technologies is an important factor – as well as the high rate of failures and delays in progress. This has perhaps lead to a level of procrastination or reluctance. The conference this year seeks to change this atmosphere and bring something new to the drawing board. A desperate need for a new standardisation method has arisen, and it is time to do something about the outdated system.

Global Clinical Trials Connect 2018 will give different organisations the chance to collaborate, brainstorm and innovate to find solutions. The idea is part of a wider movement around the world, including collaborations like this one:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180416005428/en/Global-Coalition-Adaptive-Research-Launches-Speed-Discovery.

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A new method

This industry is crying out for new strategies that benefit the industry but are also patient-centric and cater to the needs of the individual. Simplifying the clinical trial process will be positive for all, and introducing new standardisation methods will make it easier to get the data together and to recruit patients. The industry can respond with adaptive phase 1 clinical studies, seen athttp://www.richmondpharmacology.com/specialist-services/adaptive-phase-i-studies, for example. This design, when used in early phase studies, is ideal as it is cost-effective and optimises time management in a way that does not compromise safety. It includes tailor-made adaptive limits, and keeping patients exposed only to what is relevant and necessary. In order to implement strategies like this, CROs and pharmaceutical companies must work together, both to fulfil outsourcing requirements and to conduct safe and beneficial trials.

Whether by adaptive clinical trial methods or not, the hope is that by encouraging the development of a new way of conducting such trials, the industry-wide slump can be repaired and progress will continue full-throttle. It’s time for the industry to change, and it starts with this conference.

 

 

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